WoB Talk

July 13, 2009

Comic and Rant: Monday, July 13, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Kari Maaren @ 1:17 am

Today’s comic:

West-of-Bathurst-540

Today’s Rant (which would normally appear on the “Rants” page of the alumni website):

Monday, July 13, 2009:  The Rain in Calgary Falls Mainly on the Everything

I’ve been in Calgary for over a week now, and I’ve noticed a decided lack of summerness here.  It doesn’t particularly bother me; I don’t deal well with heat.  However, it’s a little odd.  I thought the weather in July was only like this in Vancouver.

It has rained just about every day, sometimes torrentially.  I think we’re supposed to get a high of 16 C today.  Yesterday had a high of 25 C, but that’s as warm as it’s got so far.  Looking at the forecasts for Toronto and Vancouver, I notice that they’re stuck in the low twenties as well.

Am I going to have to write a letter to Mr. Summer?  I like this weather, but it’s kind of freaking me out.  It’s almost as if summer has decided not to be diabolically evil for a change.  Something’s going on.  It’s a conspiracy, I tell you.

In other news:  I bet you don’t know what a bad idea it is to try to carry a digital piano, a piano stand, and an amp six blocks, then drag them all onto the C-Train during the Calgary Stampede.  Until Saturday afternoon, I didn’t either.  Okay, there were two of us, and the Stampede traffic wasn’t too bad, but I’m not sure either of us will ever be able to use our arms again.  Er…does anyone in Calgary own a truck?  Could we have it?

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9 Comments »

  1. Thanks, Kari, for posting your rant. July in Germany is strange, too – one week of humid heat, one week of humid cold, and now there seems to come another week of humid heat. Could we have some dry warm (but not too warm) air this side of Christmas – please?

    Good to read Marie’s voice again – but what will happen to her? I suppose she can’t just leave the hospital, she will have to stay there to be checked. And what about her moving in about two weeks?
    And: Will we learn more about Casey’s motives soon?

    Comment by nobilis — July 13, 2009 @ 9:00 am

  2. PS: I hope your digital piano survived!

    Comment by nobilis — July 13, 2009 @ 9:01 am

  3. Yes, the piano survived…and a good thing, too, as it was a rental.

    Marie’s visit to the psych building is based very loosely on experience (not mine personally, but that of a friend…and no, “friend” is not a euphemism here. I have never ended up in a psych ward…yet), so yeah, I may get things wrong, but I’m counting on the fact that Marie has Rahim to advocate for her. He’s getting his Ph.D. in nursing with a psychiatric sub-specialty, so it’s probable he’s personally acquainted with some of the doctors (the institution in question is actually on the U of T campus). Marie’s personal psychosis is a rather weird one, as it always and only lasts for less than a day per year, and Rahim has discussed this with the doctors…so we’ll see what happens.

    Re. Casey’s motives: be patient. Alas, the story can only move along at the pace of four panels every two days.

    Comment by Kari — July 13, 2009 @ 3:45 pm

  4. I might be wrong here but according to the WOB’s time line, Marie should have already move in to her new place before this psychotic episode, am I correct?

    Ah Global warming, when all the weather in the world begins to merge as one.

    Comment by SunshineRain — July 14, 2009 @ 2:30 am

  5. SunshineRain: Nope. August 1. (August 1 in WoB time may just be happening a bit AFTER August 1 in real-life time this year, actually…)

    Comment by Kari — July 14, 2009 @ 5:10 am

  6. In Australia you can only be put/kept in a medical facility (any sort really) against your will by police order, which requires a court order to follow along pretty quickly – well unless there is a guardianship arrangement in place. If a person is unable to respond (usually that means unconscious) then it is assumed that they want help unless there is clear evidence to the contrary. There are exceptions for particular health risks, but it’s actually quite difficult to force someone into a psychiatric ward and keep them there. I’d guess that the situation in Canada is probably not all that different in practice.

    Comment by Mer — July 14, 2009 @ 7:52 am

  7. Yep. It used to be different years ago, but now you can’t hold a person against the person’s will (as far as I know) if the person knows what is going on (and on the eighteenth, Marie was completely zoned out). In Marie’s case, I’m guessing the staff at the hospital are trying to persuade her to stick around for some tests, but they are doing it in such a way that she is not entirely aware of her right to leave, and she is phoning Rahim for help. Let’s just say that my experience with (medical) doctors has not always been a good one. Some of them have been fine, but I’ve also met some right bullies who have made me feel as if I’m doing something wrong (you know…”You have a lump in your breast? How stupid you’re being to worry about it. It’s not a bad lump. Any idiot would know that. Stop wasting my time”).

    Okay, I have issues on this one, obviously. It’s kind of a difficult situation. Marie does have a right to leave and shouldn’t be held back, but she also clearly needs help. This is the kind of dilemma that has human-rights activists and medical professionals enthusiastically tearing out their hair.

    Enter Rahim the Diplomat…

    Comment by Kari — July 14, 2009 @ 3:27 pm

  8. Oh yeah – you definitely get your doctors who are just down right bullies trying to decide for you what should be done rather than giving you information (the surgeon who wanted to operate on my knee but not tell me what they’d actually be doing – strangely I said no). It does make it hard with the whole right to refuse care thing – I must say what I find hardest is the parent’s right to refuse care for a child. As a first aider I have to be honest in that I don’t know what I would do if a parent refused important first aid for a child if the child was either (a) unable to speak for themselves, or (b) was asking for help themselves. An old friend of mine was left bleeding on the side of the road after a car crash because she told people to leave her alone as she had to call her mummy. She had a significant head injury and was behaving like a 5 year old crying for mum – but because of the law they couldn’t treat her.

    Comment by Mer — July 15, 2009 @ 1:45 am

  9. Summer has been notably absent here in Pennsylvania as well. It’s kind of eerie.

    Comment by earthgirl — July 16, 2009 @ 2:27 pm


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