WoB Talk

October 7, 2012

October 1 – 13, 2012

Filed under: Uncategorized — Kari Maaren @ 11:34 pm

Sorry I’m late with this post; I was a bit wrecked last Sunday night.  I didn’t even get a Rant done, and I also apparently forgot to make one of these posts.  Here it is now.  Ta-da.

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7 Comments »

  1. I know this is random but what features like hair, face, clothes etc, when I say snobby rich kid, (High school) who steals for fun and because he can?
    blackwolf3
    I’m writing a story and I need some ideas, if you don’t mind

    Comment by blackwolf3 — October 10, 2012 @ 3:26 am

  2. Dark hair, moderately unkempt- his parents see to it that his hair is combed every night, but other than that, he does what he can to maintain a (slightly) rebellious appearance. Fairly conservative and dressed up clothes-along the lines of business casual. However, he also wears a slightly-too-large coat that doesn’t quite match the rest of his outfit, though it matches his hair perfectly. Nice shoes- if you scuff his shoes, you piss him off. He doesn’t care about anything other than actual damage to his other clothes, however. Narrow face, sharply defined features. Usually has a slouch, just a slight one. His slouch exacerbates his slightly below-average height. A surprisingly low voice, given his build, which is fairly slim. Usually carries a book bag, as opposed to a backpack. Wears gloves occasionally, partly for effect, and partly in case he decides to do something that would work better if he doesn’t leave fingerprints.

    Hopefully at least some of that helps.

    Comment by erwaro — October 12, 2012 @ 2:54 am

  3. Sorry, blackwolf3: for some reason, I never got an e-mail about your comment, so I’m just seeing it for the first time now. Erwaro’s portrait works well. I would go with blond hair, very neat, and a teacher’s-pet persona he keeps up only in the classroom; among his equally rich friends, he’s considered a bad boy. He’s a little shorter than he would like to be but still has no problem getting girls, and the girls he does get have to be hot and rich. He needs glasses but never wears them. He is extremely polite to adults.

    Comment by Kari Maaren (@angrykem) — October 12, 2012 @ 3:06 am

  4. Erwaro you are a genuies!!!!!! So is yours Ms Maaren. Thank you, I thought of this up north/ Upper Michigan area. The plots is where a rich kid from the city breaks into a cabin in the UP and what happens to him.
    Blackwolf3, thank you for the ideas

    Comment by blackwolf3 — October 13, 2012 @ 1:23 am

  5. Oh yeah he goes to a prep school called MC Escher prep school

    Comment by blackwolf3 — October 13, 2012 @ 1:24 am

  6. Is there really such a Lysistrata translation, or is that just commentary on Lysistrata translations in general (and I know there have been a fair number of wacky ones).

    Comment by quasihumanist — October 13, 2012 @ 11:21 pm

  7. Quasihumanist: there really genuinely is. I suspect you’re reading the comic via ComicGenesis; if you go to http://www.westofbathurst.com, you’ll see a link to the actual translation. I taught the play this term. It was my first time reading it, let alone teaching it, and I just went with the translation the last prof had used. It’s in a Penguin Classics collection called Lysistrata and Other Plays, and the translator is Alan H. Sommerstein. Absolutely nothing in the comic is exaggerated or made up (except Barbara’s final line, of course). Due to lack of room, I left out some other wacky aspects: for instance, the fact that the chorus’s songs are all in rhyming doggerel. At one point, the character Myrrhine is addressed by her husband as “Myrrie baby.” Here is a genuine line of dialogue from the Spartan character Lampito (with the translator’s spelling reproduced faithfully): “And as for my mon, if he ever does turn up at home, straight awa’ he’s fitted his shield on his arm and flown off agin.” It’s really quite a diverting translation, albeit for entirely the wrong reasons. Granted, it can’t be easy to translate fifth-century-BC Athenian jokes for modern English audiences.

    Comment by Kari Maaren (@angrykem) — October 13, 2012 @ 11:34 pm


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